You know you are a greenie when you do this…

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I picked up a baby Kaffir Lime and a baby Jade Plant at Bunnings, and they don’t provide plastic bags, and the free boxes were just too big. I ain’t going to leave the pots lying around in the car, that will be messy. So… cup holder became pot holder. They sit in there snugly too! Instead of taking your pet to work, why not take your favorite pot plant to work?

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This finally arrived in the mail. 7″ tall dome propagator. Not available for sale in NZ. I spent weeks on eBay and Amazon going through all the different suppliers, all of them had dodgy product reviews. Something about cheap, thin, flimsy, plastic, no bang for bucks, cracks easily, etc etc. So, it’s quite a leap of faith on this one. I get what they mean by cheap, thin, flimsy, plastic. It is nothing like the sturdy clear plastic dome propagator you get at the garden centers. However, it is functional, definitely bang for bucks when I bought a 5 pack to average out the shipping cost which is not bang for bucks.

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It serves the intended purpose. A proper healing chamber for my grafted tomatoes. It seems like the rubber tubing method of tube grafting is more promising. And it is easy, so much easier than cleft grafting. Something different this time, after 3-4 days of complete darkness, instead of moving it to the top of the fridge, I still keep it in the hot water cupboard with the door slightly opened during the day, and closed at night.

I bought a 8 pattern sprinkler recently, out of curiosity, and its cheap on clearance price, its made of good sturdy plastic. It’s useless. Its not bang for bucks even at clearance price.

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All great things start from humble beginnings. Like this magnificent Pecan tree. Making its mark among the wildflowers.

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Elderflower Nova, growing afresh after Caesar broke most of the plant off earlier in the season.

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There’s only 3 apricots at the Orchard Cottage, will even one make it into my tummy?

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The asparagus peas were flowering, and flowering, and flowering, and I couldn’t see any peas in sight. Until I was about to pull them out, I noticed the well camouflaged peas. Then I saw all these baby things, which looked very familiar, something of a larger size that I have eaten back home, sliced into pieces and stir-fried. But these, its recommended to harvest when 3cm long.

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I finally start dealing with the overgrown peas in the greenhouse. They have gone into the shelled out stage, which is perfect for freezing. I have only managed to deal with half of it. I will finish them off next week. It is quite nice though, to be out there, picking them off and shelling out at the same time.

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Here’s the other side of the greenhouse. These would be harder to shell out because they are essentially snow peas, which have a different shape compared to true shelled out peas. I won’t be growing tall peas next season anymore, will be sticking to dwarf ones.

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The broccoli has grown into humongous heads. This is as big as mine. There’s still 2 left, I might make broccoli and pea soup next week.

I have been thinking of putting in more raised beds next season. 4 more to be exact. 3 to add on to the 3 existing for longer term crop rotation. And 1 as a permanent asparagus bed. To reduce cost for compost, I plan to use a bit of hugelkultur ingenuity by filling the base 15cm with wood before topping another 15cm of compost. Still in the day-dreaming pipeline.

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Did vanity get the better part of me? I have started doing cut flowers. Like, who can resist taking this perfectly formed rose into the house?

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Some people thought my weekend spent gardening is one of the most boring thing a *ahem* highly eligible bachelor *ahem* would do. Most of them changed their mind when I show them pictures of the Orchard Cottage. How’s that for gardening on the wild side.

 

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