The ceiling was wet. Its leaking somewhere. I opened the hot water cylinder cupboard, and its quite wet in there, something’s leaking in the attic. I found the leak in the attic eventually. Some thirsty rat must have chewed the water supply pipe so that it could get a drink, didn’t bother to inform me to patch it up. A 15mm joiner does the job. The past few warm days were good, I opened all the doors and windows to air the house out. Got the hedge trimmer out and gave the native hedges that were growing too close to the back of the house a good trim back, reduce the damp, according to River Cottage.

Bought a book. Permaculture – A Designers’ Manual. Authored by Bill Mollison and published in 1988. It cost me AU$104.45, and a painful AU$39.05 to have it posted here, it must be a really heavy book. This is the textbook for the 12 Day Permaculture Design Certificate course. If I am going to take that course one day in the future, I might as well start preparing for it now. This book better be worth the read, its cost 5 times the price of other Permaculture books. That is, if you judge the book by its price.

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About 7mm of rain has accumulated this week. We have a low of 4dC and a high of 18dC.

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The mild weather means that the greens are growing. I need to give some of the forest garden area good mowing soon. I can see signs of weeds I don’t like starting to grow. Like the cleavers. And that fumitory. Thistles and nettles are easy to deal with, with the hoe, I no longer call them foe, the way they fall prey to the hoe. Cleavers and fumitory on the other hand, a bane even for the most resilient gardener. If there’s any weed spray that kills specifically only cleavers and fumitory, I will happily pay for it.

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Daikon radish grows like weed in the forest garden. They got here because I sown packets and packets of seeds. Just like putting in piles to build a solid foundation for a building, these drillers helps build the foundation of good soil drainage. How deep does the root go?

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The pumpkins airing out. I think I might be planting a few variety of figs together in that tyre next season.

On the other hand, I have moved the some soil, really good soil, from the greenhouse, into one of the raised beds. In it, I transplanted the saffrons, and various hard neck garlic. I still have a lot of hard neck garlic left in the greenhouse, I will have to lift them, divide them, and plant them somewhere else. They have been left in there for 2 seasons now. I think I will plant them under the cherry trees. The spring onions project I did before did not take, so hopefully this will.

The saffrons I have had, had never flowered for me, I had them for a few seasons now. A blog post I stumbled upon recently shed light upon it, that I must have not planted it deep enough. The little corms just keep dividing. And dividing. And dividing.

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Early in the season I sown a lot of calendula and cornflowers, but nothing do come up. Until now, the calendula are popping up. I think there’s a few different varieties in this bundle. Might have been one of the seed balls I have made.

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The Orchard Cottage this week. I was meaning to fit the pole pruner that I got on Boxing Day Sale on to the weed eater attachment, but the engine refuse to idle, but instead stalled. Something wrong somewhere, I have sent it in for service. I must admit it wasn’t well looked after. I only use it once or twice a year. I’ve got about 25m of overgrown privet hedge to chainsaw back to a more manageable height.

By the way, there’s some volunteers needed for a conservation work at Little River this Sunday 24 May at 9am in Little River. Tract cutting, and some weeding. If you are keen, please get in touch with Banks Peninsula Conservation Trust.

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